2020 Enrollment Targets

This plan calls for enrollment growth to 37,000 by 2020, including both on-campus and distance education students.  This increase compares to a 20% growth between 2000 and 2010, when NC State’s freshman classes increased rapidly, from 3,839 in 2000 to a high of 4,792 in 2007.  Consistent with the goals described above, graduate enrollment will continue to grow as a percentage of the total, from roughly 25% to 27%, with the fastest growth occurring at the doctoral level.

2020 Enrollment Plan

2011 2020 Change
 New Freshmen
4,564
4,630
+1%
 New Ag Institute
133
140
+4%
 New Transfers
1,027
1,415
+38%
 New Master’s
1,965
2,402
+22%
 New Doctoral
575
804
+40%
 New DVM
81
100
+23%
 Total Undergraduate
23,514
24,180
+3%
 Total Master’s
5,223
6,070
+16%
 Total Doctoral
3,156
4,060
+29%
 Total DVM
312
390
+25%
 Total Non-degree-seeking
2,558
2,300
-10%
GRAND TOTAL
34,763
37,000
+6%

 

To establish targets for each college within the overall 37,000 enrollment goal for the entire university, the Enrollment Planning Committee solicited proposed targets from each college.  Those proposals were reviewed in light of the University’s new strategic plan and information related to the broad strategies outlined above, including the following.

  • Demand as expressed through applications
  • Student qualifications and admissions selectivity
  • Potential for improving diversity
  • Throughput:  retention and graduation rates,  and time to degree
  • Potential for and interest in shifting undergraduate admissions from freshmen to transfers
  • Capacity for growth:  teaching workloads, revenues vs. expenditures, cost per section, availability of space, and graduate student support

Particular care was taken to assess each college’s capacity and funding potential for graduate education.  The Committee reviewed information about the cost per student (including the cost of an average student support package for resident, domestic non-residents, and international students)  and revenues associated with enrollment (including the funding formula, tuition premiums, and savings from TA-instructed courses).   The 2020 enrollment projections show more growth in colleges whose sponsored program income is sufficient to fund research assistantships, and to programs whose students are generally self supporting.  College targets are included in Appendix A.

Implementation Strategies

The enrollment strategies described above – expanding graduate programs, strengthening undergraduate programs  – require that NC State build a research (tenured and tenure-track) faculty large enough to expand sponsored research and to provide a high quality educational experience for our students.  We will need to reverse the trends of the last decade, when headcount enrollment increased by 20%, non-tenure track faculty grew by 23%, and tenure-track faculty increased by only 1%.  To support graduate programs and overall program excellence, NC State must adopt the following strategy:

  • Increase the number of tenured and tenure-track faculty, particularly in areas of growth.
  • To the extent feasible, fill instructional positions funded through enrollment growth with permanent faculty, rather than holding them vacant for budget reductions or teaching overloads.

Like all institutions of higher education, NC State must also improve the efficiency of all its activities, including instruction.  Like all public institutions, we will try to depend less  on state support without shifting too much of the costs to students and their families.  This calls for careful enrollment planning in all units, ensuring course availability, and improved efficiency through multiple strategies:

  • Improve alignment between resources and enrollment in each college.
  • Balance enrollment growth across programs in a fiscally sound manner that considers both costs and funding.
  • Improve retention rates and time to degree at all degree levels, in part by facilitating intra-campus transfers.
  • Increase enrollment capacity in colleges that attract large numbers of intra-campus transfers.
  • Reduce the cost of instruction and improve classroom utilization through creative use of learning technologies and partnerships.
  • Re-evaluate the master plan, capital improvements plan, and space utilization strategies as needed to provide capacity in growth areas.
  • Implement research initiatives necessary to attract the resources necessary to support graduate enrollment, e.g., by implementing a parallel research plan.

With the current funding formulae (including the CVM formula) and instructional salary levels, an increase in total headcount enrollment to 37,000 and the college distribution described in Appendix A would yield around $7.5 million new funding and 30 new faculty positions each year.  The additional costs of graduate programs may be supported in part through premium tuition (largely master’s) and sponsored programs (doctoral).

 

Appendix A:  2020 Enrollment Targets


Fall Headcount Enrollment – Fall 2011

New Freshmen New External Transfers Total Undergraduate New Master’s Total Master’s New Doctoral/ DVM Total Doctoral /DVM Grand Total
 Provost 36 38 38
 CALS 717 203 4.870 199 586 68 434 5,890
 Design 120 25 577 76 235 7 26 838
 Education 134 39 825 264 799 65 452 2,076
 Engineering 1,358 211 5,940 673 1,750 214 1,044 8,734
 Natural Resources 139 89 1,316 96 344 14 97 1,757
 CHASS 500 277 4,119 228 611 42 281 5,011
 PAMS 195 33 894 65 166 134 616 1,676
 Textiles 185 13 923 24 90 9 87 1,100
 Vet Medicine 6 16 91 376 392
 Management 405 119 2,522 298 588 12 55 3,165
 DASA 811 18 1,528 1,528
 Non-Degree 2,558
Total
4,564 1,027 23,514 1,965 5,223 656 3,468 34,763

Fall Headcount Enrollment – Fall 2020

New Freshmen New External Transfers Total Undergraduate New Master’s Total Master’s New Doctoral/ DVM Total Doctoral /DVM Grand Total
 Provost 120 120 120
 CALS 930 350 5,510 230 660 87 495 6,665
 Design 120 25 630 140 375 10 35 1,040
 Education 155 50 900 260 800 100 550 2,250
 Engineering 1,300 250 5,975 725 1,880 310 1,550 9,405
 Natural Resources 170 150 1,450 110 360 30 130 1,940
 CHASS 435 325 3,820 270 720 60 340 4,880
 PAMS 240 40 1,000 75 185 155 680 1,865
 Textiles 165 65 1,000 50 110 16 110 1,220
 Vet Medicine 12 20 116 470 490
 Management 350 130 2,570 410 840 20 90 3,500
 DASA 765 30 1,325 1,325
 Non-Degree 2,300
Total
4,630 1,415 24,180 2,402 6,070 904 4,450 37,000